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Discover the ten easy ways to save on your broadband and TV

Ten easy ways to save on broadband and TV

Broadband and TV bills can take a big bite out of the family budget. With another price rise announced for this autumn by one of the big suppliers, we’ve taken a look at how you can keep surfing and watching, but pay less!

Offers end, prices go up, extras get added. The monthly bills get bigger. A full whack TV subscription can set you back more than £1,000 over the whole contract.

The average household can save £69 on broadband alone by switching when their contract ends, uSwitch estimates. And by bundling telecoms together, you can save even more, maybe hundreds.

But switching and bundling aren’t the only ways to pay less. Here are our 10 ways to bring down the cost of broadband and TV.

Know your broadband limits

Smart surfers don’t pay for more than they need. Ask your provider about your usage.

If you’re a light user, ask to downgrade to a cheaper, capped service.

If the whole household are heavy users, moving up to unlimited broadband could actually save money.

The need for speed?

Fibre broadband: superfast, snazzy and…expensive. Don’t pay if you won’t benefit. You’ll only really notice the difference if the whole household piles onto broadband at the same time, downloading loads of films and video gaming online.

Get faster broadband without paying for it

Suffering from sluggish connection speeds? Try some tricks to speed it up before splashing out on a superfast connection. Use up-to-date software, upgrade your router, keep the router switched on and put a password on your wi-fi connection to stop other people using it. If you use a desktop computer, connect to your router with an Ethernet cable rather than a wireless connection.

Pay upfront

With most internet connections you still need to have a landline, and if you’ve got the spare cash, it’s usually cheaper to pay a lump sum for a whole year’s line rental, plus you’ll end up with lower monthly payments. Weigh up the benefit against being tied to your provider for another year.

Set up a direct debit

Paying by direct debit, rather than waiting until after your bill arrives, can bring a discount of around £5 a month.

Just keep an eye on your bills to check you’re not running up a big credit or debit.

Back to basics

Remember, most providers make their money by selling expensive extras. The basic package is temptingly cheap. But then come all the add-ons. Premium channels for your TV package. Faster speeds and unlimited usage for your broadband. Extra costs to call mobiles from your landline.

Don’t pay for stuff you don’t use. Ask to ditch any extras you don’t want.

Haggle with your current company

New customers seem to get showered with all the offers and freebies, but even existing customers can ask for a better deal. Get on the phone, say you’re planning to leave. See what your current supplier will offer to persuade you to stick around.

Collect any cashback

Stop before you switch to check if you can claim any cashback. Whether you want to switch via a comparison website or by going direct to the supplier, you could get decent dosh by clicking on a cashback website first. 

Cash in on your current account

Did you know that some current accounts will pay your cashback on your TV, home phone, mobile and broadband bills? Just check your broadband or TV supplier is included.

Budget for a big commitment

Contracts for TV, broadband and phone can stretch for two years, but special offers often run out after six months. Think before you sign up. Will you be able to afford the payments when the deals are done? You could face painful termination fees if you have to abandon your contract early.

 

This guest post is from Faith Archer and doesn’t necessarily reflect the views of the Money Advice Service. You can find out more about Faith and what she does on her blog, Much More With Less

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